Beyond the policy changes, New Mexico is also considering using Distributed Ledger technology as a means of self-dissemination to update purchasing information across the state-owned enterprise, without having to manage a central repository. While such deals are sometimes seen as a way for agencies to get discounts and avoid bureaucracy, the Committee`s analysts say the deals have allowed for a common ad hoc purchasing practice with “almost no oversight” costly to the state. Please contact Cesar Alvarado to discuss the products and services you are interested in and to get a quote for your order. The New Mexico report highlights two states – Alabama and Indiana – as examples where four-year update cycles are the norm for all public information technology procurement. For the purchase of technology, New Mexico uses an agreement supported by the National Association of State Procurement Officials, valuePoint, to purchase products from Dell. Holding suppliers to account can also be difficult under domestic pricing agreements, as services are simply ordered as items in a menu and work details can sometimes go undocumented, the report says. To improve oversight, analysts at the Legislative Financing Committee recommended that Parliament require services in excess of certain dollar amounts to be entered into with separate contracts that specify what is required of sellers. . .

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